28th Oct, 2016

Solihull care home ordered to improve by watchdog

Solihull Editorial 18th Mar, 2016 Updated: 24th Oct, 2016

INSPECTORS have ordered a Solihull care home to make improvement on its safety, effectiveness and how well-led it is.

Inspectors from the Care Quality Commission highlighted a number of issues at Meadow Home Care Services Limited, on Ulverley Green Road – previously of Warwick Road, after a visit in January.

The company, which is responsible for caring for around 170 people and employs 72 care workers, provides personal care to people in their own homes.

One of the problems voiced by an inspector was with care workers who had not all received the induction and training needed to meet people’s needs safely and effectively.

It was also noted how some practices were not being checked to ensure they were working in-line with the provider’s policies and procedures with other concerns being raised with the managers’ limited understanding of the Mental Capacity Act and their responsibilities under it.

Inspectors also found the registered manager and other managers did not have sufficient knowledge and understanding of their regulatory responsibilities with the registered manager’s overview of the service not being sufficiently robust enough to ensure they were always operating effectively and safely.

On the flip side the report did note that many people and their relatives had told inspectors they felt safe using the service and that workers understood how to protect people from abuse.

Comments were also made about employees respecting people’s decisions and gaining people’s consent before giving personal care, with residents saying the workers were ‘kind and caring’.

The report highlighted, the care plans and risk assessments which contained the relevant information for workers to help provide the correct care.

It was also mentioned that people knew how to complain and were able to share their views and opinions about the service they received.

And, employees were confident on how they could raise concerns or issues with the managers which would be listened to.

Inspectors also said there were enough workers to provide the support people required and that people received their medicines as prescribed.

The Observer contacted the home for a comment but they failed to respond.