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6th Jul, 2022

LETTERS: Your discussion from around the borough in this week's Observer

Felix Nobes 16th Dec, 2018

One in five children has suffered some kind of abuse – and we know the effects can be devastating and last for years.

That’s why the NSPCC’s Speak out. Stay safe programme is teaching children how to keep themselves safe, and who they can speak to if they need help.

Delivered at no cost to schools, the programme could prevent pupils suffering from abuse or neglect.

In November, Widney Junior School in Solihull became the 20,000th in the UK to be visited by our Speak out. Stay safe team – a milestone in our mission to reach every primary school. We’re urging all schools to sign up for a visit.

With the help of our mascot Buddy, Speak out. Stay safe is spreading an important message in a lively, interactive and memorable way. Through age-appropriate, interactive assemblies and workshops children are empowered to recognise the different types of abuse, and understand how to protect themselves.

We help children to identify a trusted adult they can speak to if they are worried about themselves or a friend. They also learn about Childline, and how the service can support them.

And though we are delighted to have reached so many pupils, we will keep visiting schools every week to ensure this vital service helps to protect a generation of children from abuse.

It is our ambition to reach every school in the UK. To find out more, and request a visit for your school, go to www.nspcc.org.uk/speakout

The NSPCC Schools Service relies on volunteers to help deliver assemblies and workshops. To get involved or to find out more, visit www.nspcc.org.uk/what-you-can-do or call 0121 227 7577.

Karen Squillino, Head of NSPCC Schools Service

Let us hope that Solihull Council does not have too much input into the £280k revamp of Solihull railway station (Observer, 6 December 2018, p11).

Their £1m attempt at the Town Centre Approach scheme would lead us to expect that all we would see at the station is a wider stairway leading people to the wrong end of the platform, while the existing stairway to the right end of the platform remains unchanged.

Dave Kimber

Olton

Whilst our trees may look lovely in the Autumn, when the leaves fall they can leave a mess which can be a safety hazard on slippy pavements and block the drains stopping heavy falls of rainwater from draining away.

In previous years our council carried on the Green bin collection into December to allow for more time for leaves to be collected, as these days they can fall later in the year due to changes in our climate. However it seems due to cutbacks this year the last collections were in November, and this meant for many residents the last of the leaves went uncollected, and they have been allowed to blow on to roads and walkways.

If it is too late to re-arrange a last Green bin collection this year I hope our council will correct this next year and ensure garden waste is collected into December again.

In the meantime they should quickly get round our borough to clear leaves from our roads and pavements so that residents can get around safely and the drains are cleared.

Nick Stephens

Chair Solihull and Meriden Labour Party

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