October 1st, 2016

Hospital’s stroke unit becomes first in UK to receive dedicated training

Hospital’s stroke unit becomes first in UK to receive dedicated training Hospital’s stroke unit becomes first in UK to receive dedicated training
Updated: 4:48 pm, May 24, 2016

SOLIHULL HOSPITAL’S stroke unit has become the first in the UK to receive dedicated stroke training to ensure stroke survivors are given the best possible support during recovery.

The Stroke Association formed the new partnership with Solihull Hospital’s stroke unit to train their staff in stroke specific care.

Ward manager Angela Price enrolled the unit’s 17 health care assistants on the Stroke Association’s level two qualification in stroke and acquired brain injury – setting a benchmark to be replicated around the country.

With the aim to help people understand the importance of emergency response and treatment, the course was made possible by a donation from local stroke support group, Solihull Stroke Survivors.

In addition to the training completed, the unit’s health care assistants, nurses and therapists completed the level three stroke care management qualification.

Angela Price, ward manager at Solihull Hospital, part of Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust, said: “We decided to complete the qualifications in stroke as we wanted to build on the knowledge we already have.

“It’s been so useful to look at the current practice on the ward and take it forward.

“The course has been really valuable and will enhance the care that people receive.”

An additional five places were given to The Royal Star and Garter Home in Solihull – a charity that provides nursing and therapeutic care to the ex-service community.

Due to funding available from the government through Skills for Care, the home will be able to claim back the cost of the qualifications in full, once the students have completed.

This will enable the money to then be reinvested for another five places, so the initial investment will have an ongoing legacy.

James Benson, stroke trainer at the Stroke Association, said: “The complex nature of stroke means that each individual has their own requirement for care.

“The training helps staff to understand the emotional and physical needs of stroke survivors, how to effectively communicate with them and how to prevent the occurrence of future strokes.

“They are the first stroke ward in the UK to achieve this, which is setting a vital benchmark that can be repeated around the country.

For further information about training available from the Stroke Association, contact 01527 903911.

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